clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Ray Horton Sells Mercedes To Steelers Cafeteria Worker For $20 Before Heading West To Arizona

The six-time Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers are often referred to as the 'gold standard' of 'organizational excellence' in the National Football League. Obviously, when you win, you're in store for those types of accolades. But the Steelers' unique brand is the product of more than just on-field success. It's the people that are at the heart of the stories, and it's the stories that are at the crux of why the Steelers - despite some recent and high-profile off-field problems - are not quite like any other NFL franchise. From The Chief keeping war hero Rocky Bleier on the payroll for five years while rehabbing the gruesome leg injury he suffered serving his country in Vietnam, to past and present players traveling cross-country to watch Hines Ward compete on Dancing With The Stars, to Dick LeBeau being called 'Coach Dad' by his players - there's countless examples of how the Steelers have truly built a family atmosphere over the course of their nearly 80-year history.  

↵

Even when members of the organization are heading out of town to work elsewhere, they still manage to add to the leagcy of the 'Steelers Way.' For Ray Horton, the former secondary coach who accepted the defensive coordinator job in Arizona this offseason, that meant rewarding one of the organization's countless behind-the-scenes individuals who ensure that the recognizable names in the organization's operations can comfortably focus on football and football only.

↵

On his way out the door for the final time at Steelers headquarters, Horton made a longtime cafeteria employer's day by giving him his Mercedes:

↵
↵

When he saw [cafeteria worker Maurice "Mo"] Matthews, he said to him, "Hey, I need a favor from you. How much money you have in your pocket?"

↵

Matthews said, "I got $20."

↵

Horton took the money, looked at it and said to Matthews, "Sold for $20!"

↵

And then Horton handed Matthews the keys to his car and told him to keep it.

↵
↵
Horton and Matthews had struck up a friendship over the years, so it wasn't as if Horton just picked a random employee to surprise. No, it was about relationships built and maintained through gestures of goodwill and lasting impact. Horton apparently had Matthews take him for one final ride in the Mercedes the following day, a trip to the airport where he'd officially say goodbye to the city of Pittsburgh, the Steelers organization, and all the friendships and acquaintances he'd made during his seven years as an assistant with the Steelers.

Photographs by dizfunk used in background montage under Creative Commons. Thank you.